Thursday, March 12, 2009

Monologue


Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

LUCKY: Given the existence as uttered forth in the public works of Puncher and Wattmann of a personal God quaquaquaqua with white beard quaquaquaqua outside time without extension who from the heights of divine apathia divine athambia divine aphasia loves us dearly with some exceptions for reasons unknown but time will tell and suffers like the divine Miranda with those who for reasons unknown but time will tell are plunged in torment plunged in fire whose fire flames if that continues and who can doubt it will fire the firmament that is to say blast heaven to hell so blue still and calm so calm with a calm which even though intermittent is better than nothing but not so fast and considering what is more that as a result of the labours left unfinished crowned by the Acacacacademy of Anthropopopometry of Essy-in-Possy of Testew and Cunard it is established beyond all doubt all other doubt than that which clings to the labours of men that as a result of the labours unfinished of Testew and Cunard it is established as hereinafter but not so fast for reasons unknown that as a result of the public works of Puncher and Wattmann it is established beyond all doubt that in view of the labours of Fartov and Belcher left unfinished for reasons unknown of Testew and Cunard left unfinished it is established what many deny that man in Possy of Testew and Cunard that man in Essy that man in short that man in brief in spite of the strides of alimentation and defecation is seen to waste and pine waste and pine and concurrently simultaneously what is more for reasons unknown in spite of the strides of physical culture the practice of sports such as tennis football running cycling swimming flying floating riding gliding conating camogie skating tennis of all kinds dying flying sports of all sorts autumn summer winter winter tennis of all kinds hockey of all sorts penicilline and succedanea in a word I resume and concurrently simultaneously for reasons unknown to shrink and dwindle in spite of the tennis I resume flying gliding golf over nine and eighteen holes tennis of all sorts in a word for reasons unknown in Feckham Peckham Fulham Clapham namely concurrently simultaneously what is more for reasons unknown but time will tell to shrink and dwindle I resume Fulham Clapham in a word the dead loss per caput since the death of Bishop Berkeley being to the tune of one inch four ounce per caput approximately by and large more or less to the nearest decimal good measure round figures stark naked in the stockinged feet in Connemara in a word for reasons unknown no matter what matter the facts are there and considering what is more much more grave that in the light of the labours lost of Steinweg and Peterman it appears what is more much more grave that in the light the light the light of the labours lost of Steinweg and Peterman that in the plains in the mountains by the seas by the rivers running water running fire the air is the same and than the earth namely the air and then the earth in the great cold the great dark the air and the earth abode of stones in the great cold alas alas in the year of their Lord six hundred and something the air the earth the sea the earth abode of stones in the great deeps the great cold an sea on land and in the air I resume for reasons unknown in spite of the tennis the facts are there but time will tell I resume alas alas on on in short in fine on on abode of stones who can doubt it I resume but not so fast I resume the skull to shrink and waste and concurrently simultaneously what is more for reasons unknown in spite of the tennis on on the beard the flames the tears the stones so blue so calm alas alas on on the skull the skull the skull the skull in Connemara in spite of the tennis the labours abandoned left unfinished graver still abode of stones in a word I resume alas alas abandoned unfinished the skull the skull in Connemara in spite of the tennis the skull alas the stones Cunard tennis... the stones... so calm... Cunard... unfinished...

This might help a little bit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-zhUBPDitk


This monologue is the only thing that Lucky says in “Waiting for Godot.” The entire monologue is two sentences long and it is 700 words. This monologue is a crazy example of enjambment because there is not punctuation or grammar use in correct places. I’m not going to pretend that this monologue makes sense because it doesn’t and that is the point of it. Part of the purpose of this monologue is to reveal, in obscurest fashion, the utter absurdity of life. However, this monologue does have some profound meaning with in it though it can be interpreted in millions of ways.
Lucky is an abused slave to one of the other characters. This monologue begins with the questioning of God. In essence he says if there is a God then why do all of these things happen. He makes many obscure allusions to places like Oise, the Seine and Bresse. These places were have connections with World War II. "Waiting for Godot" questions the meaning of life. The existential/ absurdist thought of the play was some what common in contemporary writing of the time period after World War II. World War II forced many people to come to terms with death. It also made many question God and life because of the horrors of war and also the autrocities that Hitler committed. In addition, he constantly repeats the phrase “for reasons unknown” exemplifying the unpredictable world and how little we as humans know about it.

3 comments:

Lauren said...

Other than the topics of God and absurdity, what other topics/themes/allusions can you dissect from this monologue?

Christina D said...

"suffers like the divine Miranda" refers to the character Miranda in Shakespeare's "The Tempest". She is the beautiful (divine?) daughter of Prospero, and has been living as a castaway with him on an island.
"a result of the labours left unfinished crowned by the Acacacademy of Anthropopopometry of Essy in Possy of Testew and Cunard it is established beyond all doubt all other doubt than that which clings to the labours of men that as a result of the labours unfinished..." (it goes on like this for a dozen more lines or so) Besides for absurdity overall, the theme seems to be ridiculing academia and great tasks undertaken that are related to academia and studies, and how they're never finished. Also, Lucky is ridiculing the pomp and pretention is such "educated" men by dropping names (that i don't really recognize...) left and right in that section, and by trying to use the same big words, which Lucky ends up stuttering on.
"..In the year of their lord six hundred something the air the earth the sea the earth abode of stones in the great deep the great cold on sea an' land and in the air..." This particular piece of this monologue isn't mocking God exactly, but more the language and phrasing of preachers and bibles. But Lucky says "the year of THEIR Lord six hundred something", which shows his general separation from the free "religious" people who say "in the year of our Lord" (also hinting at mocking pretension)
I was also wondering whether the extensive list of activities/sports was just referencing "gentlemen's sports" or something....

Lauren said...

I interpreted the extensive list of sport/activities as just the absurdity of the meaningless activities that people part take in. This juxtaposes with the serious topics that Lucky talks about in his monologue like life, death and religion. These things all have real meaning but aren't addressed frequently where as the things that many people dwell on meaningless things like their sports/ activities.